BHAKTI

Bhakti is derived from the Sanskrit word Bhaj, which means loving service, and Yoga in Sanskrit means connection. Bhakti Yoga means to connect with the Divine by the means of loving devotional service. We all have the seed of Bhakti within us, but it is in a dormant state and we’re not aware of its existence until we start watering and nurturing the soil in which it’s planted.

Through this process the Bhakti within us – the love for the Divine – awakens.

The Ancient yogic scriptures describe the most effective method for awakening the dormant seed in this modern time to be the chanting of the mantras and Divine names. Through chanting, we will gradually cleanse our mind and wipe away the coverings of dust from the mirror of our hearts and come to the state of self-realization – the ultimate goal of all yogic practices.

Chanting

There are two different ways to chant the Divine names; meditating on the names by oneself – called Japa or the mantra meditation, and singing together accompanied with musical instruments and even dancing – called Kirtan or congregational chanting. In our Bhakti Yoga tradition we are developing devotion and love towards Krishna, the Supreme being, as taught in the most important book on yoga, the Bhagavad Gita. Krishna is the embodiment of love and full of eternal knowledge and bliss which we are all seeking for, and in the same Bhagavad Gita it is explained that Krishna and Krishna’s name are the same. So when we are chanting the names of Krishna, it means we are calling out to that which we want to connect with; Lord Krishna is actually dancing on our tongue.

The mantra we chant is called the Maha Mantra, the great mantra for deliverance:

Hare Krishna
Hare Krishna
Krishna Krishna
Hare Hare
Hare Rama
Hare Rama
Rama Rama
Hare Hare

It is composed of three words of the Supreme being: Hare, Krishna and Rama. Hare refers to the Divine energy of the Lord, Krishna and Rama refer to the Divine as the all-attractive and all-powerful one who is the source of all pleasure. The mantra is most commonly translated as, “O Lord, O Energy of the Lord, please engage me in Your service.” It was popularized in the sixteenth century by Sri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu, and spread worldwide in the late twentieth century by Srila Prabhupada and his followers in ISKCON.

Japa literally means ‘to speak softly’. There are numerous techniques for meditation in different spiritual traditions and mantra meditation is one of them. In our Bhakti Yoga tradition we chant the Mahamantra, using the meditation beads or japa beads. In japa, the meditator individually and softly recites Krishna’s names with the use of the beads, similar to a rosary.

Repetition of this mantra awakens the soul and mystically brings strength, peace and happiness. It helps us to tranquilize the mind, understand the self and build positive karma and ultimately it connects us with the wisdom within and reveals our original spiritual identity.

Kirtan is a dynamic musical experience, practiced as group chanting of the sacred mantras. In the Bhakti Yoga tradition, sound is used as a powerful tool for inner transformation. Kirtan is a simple and authentic way to relieve stress, refresh the mind and connect with the heart. Both new meditators as well as seasoned practitioners will find the benefits in the practice, as it is explained to be the most effective method for spiritual advancement in the modern age.

Sadhana means our personal practice of connecting to our true selves and to God through the power of prayer, meditation and acquiring knowledge. These spiritual practices allow us to tune into the frequency of grace of love and compassion that’s already within us, and when we put time aside to do this daily, we actually establish a deep foundation and clear direction for our life.

Seva means selfless service and it’s one of the key components and aspects of Bhakti. On the path of Bhakti Yoga, we’re trying to cultivate this spirit of selfless service through sharing and giving in the mood of remembering our original identities as parts and parcels of the Divine – Krishna. Understanding this, everything and everyone is thus connected, so serving other fellow living beings and everything around us with the Higher goal of bringing spiritual harmony to the whole of society, means serving the Divine and helping others to do the same. With this principle of seva, we can transcend differences based on culture, colour, nationality, religion, gender, age and even species, and can live together in love, compassion and harmony, thus realizing the spiritual oneness in service of the Divine.

Scroll to Top
Scroll to Top